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K11 Event
2020-09-01 to 2021-12-31
(Online) Eco-leadership Programme

Online Eco-leadership Programme



Do you know how many insect species live in Hong Kong? 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000? No one knows the exact number, but for sure, they exceed any other groups of animals or plants in terms of diversity. Another certainty is the paramount role that insects play in the functioning and health of ecosystems, even if these roles are often underappreciated or even misunderstood by most people.



Nature Discovery Park and the School of Biological Sciences of The University of Hong Kong co-developed the online eco-leadership programme, which aims to introduce the ecological importance of biodiversity and participants will learn about the direct resources insects provide to human, as well as the influence they have in science and art.



Date: Self-paced with all modules to be completed by 31 Dec 2020



Programme details:



Week 1

Part 1: Little insects keep the world moving.

Part 2: Service-oriented little insects – why not!



Week 2

Part 1: Love art, love science = love insects! Insects benefit various aspects in our lives.

Part 2: How are insects collected responsibly? Are they everywhere?



Week 3

Part 1: Learn insect-inspired “morse code” and share scientific facts confidently!

Part 2: Insects have superhero capabilities too, what would they be?



Language: English



Age: 12+





Nature & Wellness
Tour
Paid
Family Course
Kids Course
Date
2020-09-01 to 2021-12-31
Time
09:00 - 12:00
Location
Online
Price
Guest
900
General Member
900
KLUB 11 Gold Card Member
900
KLUB 11 Artist KLUB Paid Member
900
KLUB 11 Black Card Member
900
More Details
$
HKD $900
/ Person

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